Everything you need to know about the Thai youth soccer team rescue

Tonya Becker
July 11, 2018

A Chilean miner who spent more than two months trapped underground told AFP he was celebrating the rescue of 12 Thai boys and their football coach who were imprisoned in a flooded cave for 18 days.

Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, speaking Tuesday before the final rescue was completed, said the boys were given an anti-anxiety medication to help with their perilous removal from the cave. All have now been transferred to hospital.

Four were rescued Sunday and another four were rescued on Monday.

The former Governor of the Chiang Rai, where the operations are taking place, Narongsak Osatanakorn, said: "We expect that if there is no unusual condition. the 4 boys, 1 coach, the doctor, and 3 SEALs who have been with the boys since first day will come out today". They began again at 11 am on Monday after the teams had stopped for the night to rest and to replenish equipment and oxygen supplies. But a short period of less heavy rainfall this week made the rescue mission possible.


The boys and their coach, all from the "Wild Boars" soccer team, became trapped by rainy season floodwater on June 23rd when they had set out to explore the vast cave complex after soccer practice.

Two British divers found them nine days later huddled on a muddy ledge in pitch darkness more than 4km inside the cave system.

The youth soccer team rescued from a cave in Thailand will be unable to accept FIFA's invitation to attend the World Cup final. They hope to interview the Thai Navy Seal divers and their foreign counterparts, as well as the rescued team members and their families.

In this handout photo released by Tham Luang Rescue Operation Center, Thai rescue teams walk inside cave complex where 12 boys and their soccer coach went missing, in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai province, in northern Thailand, Monday, July 2, 2018.


There was a global outpouring of relief after it was announced that all 12 of the boys and their coach had been rescued. He added that all of them were generally healthy and in good spirits, thanks to their "high immunity" from playing football. Jedsada said they were uncertain what type of infections the boys could face "because we have never experienced this kind of issue from a deep cave". The hospital has sent test samples from the boys to a lab in Bangkok.

The boys remain in quarantine but some of their parents have been able to see their children through the glass.

Musk has offered a "kid-sized" submarine, named Wild Boar after the kids' soccer team, to help in the rescue operation.

Rescuers need to hold the boys' oxygen tanks in front of them and swim pencil-like through submerged holes.


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